Step Aerobics Music

Finding The Right Step Aerobics Music

Though Originally Meant To Be Low Impact, Step Aerobics Music Has Graduated To High Tempo

The aim of step aerobics music is to provide a low-impact, high intensity alternative to floor aerobic workouts. With fitness continually improving, thanks to consistent and regular aerobic workouts, the body begins to adapt to the same level of intensity and this means that one has to work harder to achieve the targeted heart rate. Transforming the floor aerobic workout to the step aerobic workout means getting more aerobic intensity in the same or less time. The intensity of step aerobic music should be sufficient to combine the interdependent variables of step height, propulsion or power moves, arm moves, choreography into synchronized beats, as well.

Because stepping is meant to adjust to the intensity factors on the floor, to ensure safety, one needs to have step aerobics music that is not too fast or too slow. Hitting the pause button is one means of lowering or increasing the tempo of the step aerobics music. The step aerobics music should provide the exerciser enough motivation as well as excellent cueing and should work well with complex choreography moves. There is certainly no shortage of step aerobics music available and one can shop for it at online stores for added convenience. Some of the music is specially performed to aid a person in step aerobics and some even include aerobic training steps in poster format.

Many step aerobics music videos that were cut in the 90’s used basic step choreography and the patterns used were easy to follow. Sometime later, instructors began to spice up the step aerobics music to accommodate fancier dance steps and this has resulted in instructors trying to make the choreography more alluring, which requires having music that matches these requirements. What is important to remember is that the step aerobics music should be able to meet the perfect 32 count as well as have 120 beats per minute to facilitate better aerobics workout exercise routines.

During the 1990s and, more particularly, in 1994, the accepted top stepping speed was 122 beats per minute but this got revised in 1997, when Step Reebok upgraded the recommended stepping speed to 128 beats per minute and, presently, even this stepping speed has been further been revved up, all to increase aerobic intensity. Some studies have even revealed that tempos that exceed 128 beats per minute cause the impact forces of stepping to significantly increase and this has resulted in these being classified as high impact activity.